Women of the 2023 Triple Crown Challenge

When it comes to the most intimidating of bikepacking “events,” one has to think that the Triple Crown Challenge stands apart from the rest. With the goal of completing the Tour Divide, Colorado Trail Race, and Arizona Trail Race during their Grand Departs in the same calendar year, it’s a massive undertaking and a huge commitment. We were stoked to see four incredible women complete the Triple Crown Challenge this year. Katya Rakhmatulina, Alexandera Houchin, Hannah Simon, and Kristen Tonsager became the third, fourth, fifth and sixth women to have ever completed this challenge, following in the footsteps of Alice Drobna who finished it on a singlespeed in 2015 and Ana Jager who completed the challenge in 2022.   

We wanted to hear about what it takes to complete the Triple Crown, what challenges these women faced, and some of their high points on the trail. We asked them which was their favorite race and which was the most difficult. They shared about favorite pieces of gear, best snacks, and things that they’ll never eat again. We’re excited to share their insights from the trail and advice for others who want to attempt the Triple Crown!

Alexandera Houchin

What inspired you to attempt the Triple Crown Challenge? 

In 2018 I attempted a pseudo Triple Crown Challenge, setting out for an ITT of the Arizona Trail 750 and the grand departs of the CTR and the Tour Divide. I ended up getting rerouted on the AZT that year due to fire and since I was using the AZT to ride to the start of the Tour Divide, I quit riding the AZT in Flagstaff and continued on to Idaho instead of finishing the AZT skipping the Grand Canyon portage. I realized how truly challenging it was to attempt all three of these races in a calendar year, especially to do them at a “race pace”. I’d learned about the 3 Crown Challenge from Brett Stepanik, a local bike friend from Madison, WI and watched him dedicate so much of his life to the attempt. I wanted to come back to try again, but was vastly aware of the cost to participate. I never had enough resources until 2023 to actually compete. I also wanted to see what I could physically do on a singlespeed.

What intimidated you most about the challenge before you started?  

I don’t know that I felt intimidated about the challenge because I felt very aware of what it truly takes to finish having “failed” at a previous attempt at doing all three races in a calendar year.

I felt intimated about the “competition”. Albeit, we’re mostly friends racing alongside each other, I really wanted to give everything to lay down a fast time. I felt like I had a shot at besting Alice Drobna’s record and holding the overall women’s Triple Crown Challenge Record. I also felt like I could challenge Andrew Strempke’s singlespeed Triple Crown Challenge Record. Now that we’re on the other side of it all, I didn’t set a new overall women’s Triple Crown Challenge Record or a new singlespeed Triple Crown Challenge Record, but I totally tried and I feel really good about my effort. It was amazing to set my sights really high, to have set backs, to come in second and celebrate with all my friends at the finish line of the AZTR.

I went into the whole thing with sights on records, but in the end learned that it’s for the love and connection I find to my fellow competitors out there. I would give up any record or win to preserve my relationships to the people I race out there. 

What is a high point you experienced during your races?

I had almost a high the entire AZTR. It’s my favorite trail, I think. It’s where I met my Johnny years ago, it’s where we fell in love. It’s where I met Zack. It’s where I learned how to mountain bike. It’s the place I’ve been most humbled. The Strempke’s have been at every single one of my AZTR finishes, whether it’s 10 days or 15 days. I was legitimately having fun. I enjoyed chasing Katya with all I had, even though I couldn’t hang on to her blazing fast pace after Picketpost. I found myself catching up to really fast dudes and surprised myself. Compared to the other races, I was in a good emotional place before the start of this race having shared an Airbnb with Katya for two weeks before the race. I was able to build up my self confidence alongside her. She really made a huge impact on my life this year.

Tell us about a low point during your Triple Crown. Did you ever feel like you were going to have to quit?

I wanted to quit the Tour Divide so bad and start over! I chose the wrong gear ratio for my body and kind of just had to live with it. Because swapping out cogs is totally out of the ethos of riding singlespeed, I just stuck with a monster gearing that left me walking so many road climbs I would usually be able to pedal. Restarting wasn’t an option because the other aspect of the Triple Crown Challenge is to start with the Grand Departs. I just had to live with my choice for 18 days. It was a beautiful tragedy. I’d never had to dig so deep to press forward. I never had to feel so much shame for my ego. I remembered one of my main goals for the year; I wanted to lower all the women’s singlespeed records on each course. I had to dig SO deep to catch, and later pass my previous record dot. In the end, I’d only beat my former record by two hours. I went faster and never gave up. Looking back now, I am incredibly proud of sticking it out. I love having “bad” races. It just makes the good ones that much better. I find so much more personal growth in the dark times than the light times.

What did your time between races look like? 

After each race, I spent about a week with a small film crew re-creating scenes from the races for a documentary film project we’re working on. I wore my nasty, crunchy, race clothes, and pulled myself up from a puddle to get beautiful shots in the places we ride our bikes during these races. It kinda dragged out the exhaustion from the races a little longer than in the past.

After the Tour Divide, I was so sleepy! I went back “home” to our truck camper at the base of the trail of Mount Shavano, a 14er. We camped at 10,000 feet for 5 weeks before the Colorado Trail Race. I spent my days trail running, hiking with Amanda and riding a full suspension, geared bike. I was broken and burnt out from the Tour Divide and wanted to change up my day-to-day. I learned a lot from riding gears, mostly to be kind to myself about always racing a singlespeed. And from walking, I really enjoy slowing down and walking.

After the Colorado Trail, I went back home to my reservation in northern Minnesota and participated in our sacred manoomin harvest for three weeks. I spent the better part of three weeks standing in a canoe for 8 hours a day with someone I love in the back of the canoe. I spent my days not exercising (outside of ricing) and healing my spirit. I parched and finished our rice and was able to clean some for gift giving. I probably ate too much junk food, and celebrated with wine a little too long into the night a few times. Two weeks before the Arizona Trail Race, Johnny and I drove our vehicles from Colorado to Tucson, where we got an Airbnb for two weeks. There, we focused on heat training. We went to hot yoga everyday, ran in the desert at the hottest time in the day, and rode a bit. I crashed pretty bad about a week before the race was to start and couldn’t ride my bike for 7 days leading up to our tour to the start. 

I rode my bike to the start of each of these races. Riding more than 2,000 miles to the start of the Tour Divide, about 200 miles to the start of the Colorado Trail and roughly 150 miles to the start of the Arizona Trail.Did you have a favorite race in the Triple Crown? What was special about that particular race?

I mentioned the AZTR was my favorite. It still is, and will probably always be. It’s the community, the style of riding, the pure difficulty of the whole thing that keeps me coming back. It’s hard. 

Rank the races from easiest to most difficult. Why would you rank them that way? 

Overall: Tour Divide < Colorado Trail < Arizona Trail

Each route get progressively more remote. The Arizona being the most remote and technical of them all. Additionally, you need to be able to hike with a huge load on your pack through the Grand Canyon in the Arizona Trail Race, which is probably the most arduous physical feat I’ve ever done. It hurts, and it’s very hard and doesn’t relate to biking really at all. The Tour Divide is the outlier, with very little technical riding and with almost daily resupplies if you’re riding more than 100 miles a day. 

Mental: Colorado Trail < Arizona Trail < Tour Divide

The Tour Divide is so long and so boring to me. I dread the road sections in the single track races; the Tour Divide is a gravel road race, not a mountain bike race to me. I had a hard time staying motivated during the Tour Divide. I struggled the most with the Tour Divide because of the significance of the route in my life. It was the route that changed my life, but I have evolved as a rider so much since my first time on the route. It’s hard not to cling to the past and to let go. Which, I think I finally have let go. 

What was the most challenging part of completing the Triple Crown? (mental challenges? physical? dealing with real life?) 

I think the most challenging part of the challenge is the amount of financial resources required to race. I haven’t finished my post budget yet, but I allocated almost $17,000 for my race calendar this year (Spring AZT 300, TD, CTR and AZTR). That’s incredibly unrealistic for most people seeing as there are no purses for the winners. I know I would have never been able to complete this as fast as I did if it weren’t for my sponsors at EBCI, Chumba, Broken Spoke Bike Studio and Industry Nine.

Do you have a favorite piece of gear that you used in all three races? 

My kLite was easily my favorite addition to my kit this year. 

What was your favorite snack on the trail? Are there any foods that you will never eat again?

I will never eat a Complete Cookie ever again. 

I liked pre cooked bacon on almost every race. Also, Subway always made me happy. Also Ramen noodles. Yum.

What did it feel like when you got to the finish line of the AZT after completing all three races? 

I was STOKED! All my boys were there, Andrew, Connor, Zack, Johnny, Corey and Dane. I went so much faster than I ever had and I was just so high from finishing the Triple Crown Challenge that I was euphoric. I felt so so so happy to see and hug Andrew Strempke as he is the singlespeed Triple Crown Record holder and has been there every time I’ve finished the race. He just cares so much about the community, I was stoked that he was there. We camped out a few days to make sure we could see everyone come in. Hugging Hannah at the finish was a priority for me as we rode together in every single race of the 3Crown this year. She had an amazing year and I was so proud of her. Same with Kristen, I’ve ridden alongside her for years, and it was incredible to watch her ride in to the finish— very fast I will add. She went so fast in the AZT this year. Lastly, being there for Katie’s finish was the best one. Her parent’s showed up and it was tears all over for me. I loved seeing how much her family supported her and also feel very connected to her as another female singlespeeder. I know how hard this course is on a singlespeed, and just saw her for how hard she worked to cross the finish line. A career Triple Crown for her, so it was all emotions, bingeing on the smorgasbord of snacks and joy at the finish line. Probably the best part of the whole thing for me relaxing, sun basking and hanging with the homies at the finish line…

Do you have any advice for someone lining up for the Triple Crown next year? 

Make friends with your competition, make friends with the people who are attempting the Triple Crown. It’s good to be in something so big with each other. Having a friend to vent to may keep you from quitting. Also, get good at technical mountain biking. The hardest race is the last one. These courses are challenging and you sacrifice so much to be at the starting line. 

You have to really want this to achieve this. Be open to the lessons that come to you. Be open to failure, success and the mundane. It’s not always glory, bliss and cupcakes. Sometimes it’s just grinding and pity. Write about it. Take pictures. Share it with your friends. Make a big deal out of finishing. 


Hannah Simon

What inspired you to attempt the Triple Crown Challenge? 

My boss, Russell, sent me Lael’s Instagram post announcing that she would be racing the Triple Crown in 2023 and he suggested that I go chase her through it.

What intimidated you most about the challenge before you started?  

Each of these races are typically the biggest race that anyone would do in a calendar year, so trying to complete all three in just six months was too big of a logistical nightmare to digest all at once. I ended up having to focus on each race individually and not allow myself to look too far ahead to the next one.

What is a high point you experienced during your races?

Honestly, my tour from Missoula up to Banff before Tour Divide, which was before the entire Triple Crown, was the best time I have had on a bike. I got to challenge myself by still riding around 100 miles per day, but I stopped and had lunch each day and I slept for 8 hours every night. I got to take my time when I wanted to and push myself when I felt like it. I met some super generous people in the towns I stayed in and I was reminded just how powerful bikes can be. You can get yourself just about anywhere under your very own power. It was a beautiful time to reflect on when things got really tough in each of these races. 

Tell us about a low point during your Triple Crown. Did you ever feel like you were going to have to quit?

After completing Tour Divide I knew that I had to finish CT and AZT against all odds. The Divide is such a massive time commitment that I couldn’t swing taking off that much time to race it again. There wasn’t ever a time that I broke down enough to consider quitting during any of the races because quitting would only solve the immediate circumstance. I was miserable for a portion of each of these races, but quitting wasn’t going to make me any less miserable.

What did your time between races look like? 

After Tour Divide I felt like I had ridden enough mileage and spent enough time in the saddle that I could cut back on the amount of time I was training on the bike, so I shifted my focus to weight training. I was still riding daily: commuting eight miles a day, riding to the gym and participating in weekly group rides, so I was still getting ~100 miles per week. In addition to training, I was working 40hrs/week managing a bike shop, saving up money to find my way to the next start line. It was a matter of weeks between each race and they never seemed to last very long.

Did you have a favorite race in the Triple Crown? What was special about that particular race?

Many people have asked about my ‘favorite’ and I have to say that I don’t necessarily have one. They are all so different that it’s hard to compare them. If I had to rank them it would be CT, Tour Divide and then AZT, which, not surprisingly, mirrors my answer for ranking them in difficulty, as well.

Rank the races from easiest to most difficult. Why would you rank them that way?

I’ll start by stating the obvious: none of these trails are easy. They are all challenging in different ways. I’d put CT as the ‘easiest’ because it is the shortest mileage and takes the least amount of time. Altitude makes it hard to ever catch your breath and the weather can slow you way down, but there are enough moderately accessible resupplies and plenty of water sources. The biggest challenge of Tour Divide is how long you’re out there. The RECORD for fastest Tour Divide is STILL two weeks. No matter what, you will be riding your bike every day for two weeks through some pretty climby and sometimes rough roads. Tour Divide is also the most ambiguous: show up in Banff at this time, on this day and figure out how to get yourself all the way through the country to the middle-of-nowhere, New Mexico. AZT takes the cake for the most challenging because it is the most remote, rugged and varied terrain of all three. You have to be super cognizant of both food and water because the resupply is so scarce. Additionally, you need to be able to deal with a full 100 degree swing in temperature from 105 degrees south of Tucson to just 5 degrees on the north rim. Then of course there’s that whole Grand Canyon portion that no one can really, truly prepare you for because it is so absolutely ridiculous you have to just see for yourself. Lastly, getting to the start and home from the finish is by far the hardest out of all three races. You start in the middle of nowhere and finish there, too. Thank goodness for generous friends!

What was the most challenging part of completing the Triple Crown? (mental challenges? physical? dealing with real life?)

There is not very much time between each of the races for any kind of recovery: physical, mental, emotional. You do not have the time to dwell on anything too long before you have to be ready to take on the next trail. It wears on you, but there isn’t any time to try to address that exhaustion, either. I am fortunate to have had a stable bike shop job, a consistent friend group and a very reliable home to return to after each race. This was both comforting and also a little surreal. It is very easy to come back to a place that hasn’t changed at all, but can be unsettling when you yourself have changed so much.

Do you have a favorite piece of gear that you used in all three races?

I had a few things that came with me through the entire Triple Crown that I guarded pretty fiercely once I realized they had been with me the whole time. My light blue, shiny, hooded Columbia/PFG sun shirt that I picked up while passing through Steamboat on Tour Divide was a staple for my Triple Crown. It kept me from countless gnarly sunburns, I’m sure. I used the same sleep kit throughout the whole Triple Crown, shout out to my extra comfy Big Agnes inflatable sleeping pad that made it all the way through Arizona, the thorniest place on earth. I always mention my Leatherman, as well. It’s the most useful gift I have ever been given and I won’t ever race a bikepacking route without it.

What was your favorite snack on the trail? Are there any foods that you will never eat again?

I cannot walk into a Subway without a little involuntary gag from the smell. I can thank Tour Divide for that. On the CT I ate a lot of ProBars and peanut butter. I have found that if I smother something in peanut butter I can usually stomach it pretty well. For AZT it was lots of Uncrustables and frozen Amy’s burritos. The vegan bean and rice one definitely holds up the best after a few days on the trail.

What did it feel like when you got to the finish line of the AZT after completing all three races? 

These finishes are always wildly anticlimactic. I even had a whole crowd of people ready to welcome me with hugs and warm quesadillas, but I anticipated feeling more accomplished than I ended up feeling. While I was out on each of these trails, I had this massive longing to be at the finish. I would work myself up into tears thinking about it. Then at the actual end I think I am always just a little surprised that I don’t have a bigger emotional reaction. It just ends and immediately it’s onto the next!

I have been trying pretty intentionally to get myself to process this whole year. It is difficult to wrap my head around what it means to have completed this challenge amongst some of bikepacking’s most accomplished women racers. It’s wild to realize that I committed to doing this only a year ago. It has taken up so much of my mental capacity since then that it feels like a more significant amount of time than just a year. I am sure the lessons will continue to reveal themselves as I continue to reminisce on my time out racing these trails. Writing out these responses for articles like this one and recording episodes with Bikes or Death after each race has helped with reminding me that yes, I did actually do that, it did in fact happen and absolutely, it’s a big deal!

Do you have any advice for someone lining up for the Triple Crown next year?

Find the confidence somewhere inside yourself that wholeheartedly believes that you can do it. You don’t have to talk about it or explain yourself to anyone, but it really helps to have an inner voice that can tell you, even in your weakest moments, you are capable of completing the Triple Crown. Because you are! We are so much more resilient and resourceful than we allow ourselves to believe. Bikes can help us see that and understand it in a very palpable way.

Is there anything else you’d like to share? 

Somewhere along the Arizona Trail I realized that I wasn’t sure that racing the Triple Crown was something that I specifically wanted. It was suggested to me as a logical next step in my budding bikepack racing career. Though I have loved the challenge of doing one of the most difficult things one can do in this sport, I have recognized that there were times when I had a pretty bad attitude toward it all. I think this came on for a number of reasons: exhaustion, frustration, hardly any time to recover or process. I had to really reconstruct my mental approach to AZT and figure out what about it I was really excited for in order to get myself to complete it. Though I chose the Triple Crown, I am not sure that I wanted it. So here’s to pursuing what we actually want in 2024! Thanks so much always to all of you who are willing to listen to my words and read what I have to say. Your support gets me through every bit of this experience!


Katya Rakhmatulina

What inspired you to attempt the Triple Crown Challenge? 

I only set off to ride the Tour Divide after many summers of pushing it off. Switching jobs then gave me the time off to do the CTR and the AZT. The stars have aligned further and somehow the Triple Crown just happened. Still amazed that injuries, money, mechanicals, etc have not taken me out.

What intimidated you most about the challenge before you started?  

I was unaware I was doing the Triple Crown so just took one step at a time, and (mostly) had a good time.

What is a high point you experienced during your races?

The bikepacking community is amazing and it has been my highlight before, during, and after all the races.  

Tell us about a low point during your Triple Crown. Did you ever feel like you were going to have to quit?

There were a few low points; on the Tour Divide, I had enough mechanicals where I thought one would take me out of the competition. Before both the CTR and the AZT, I was dreading the idea of racing, but as soon as I was pedaling, the fears went away (more or less).

What did your time between races look like? 

I generally felt pretty good right after the races and didn’t need much recovery. After the Tour Divide, I’ve been insatiably hungry even laying on the couch. After the CTR and the AZT, all I needed was good sleep for a few days.

In between races, I did not have a rigorous training schedule, just tried to stay active everyday and made sure that my exercise was fun. Plus lots of crossfit activities like climbing, running, hiking, and weight lifting.

Did you have a favorite race in the Triple Crown? What was special about that particular race?

CTR, hands down! I love mountains and technical riding. It’s fun to spend hours climbing a mountain, to then have a blast on a downhill.

Rank the races from easiest to most difficult. Why would you rank them that way? 

CTR, Tour Divide, AZT

CTR is now my favorite race. I do recognize that it is mega-difficult, but the abundance of water and its relatively short distance makes it a bit easier than the other two races

Tour Divide is not technically difficult, but requires a lot of mental strength, since it is so long.

The Arizona Trail is both technically difficult and takes a long time to complete. It also lacks water and daylight, so in my opinion, it is the most difficult race of the three.

What was the most challenging part of completing the Triple Crown?

The amount of money that went into these races. 

Do you have a favorite piece of gear that you used in all three races? 

My 10F quilt! I was never worried about freezing even when it was very cold at the end of the AZT.

What was your favorite snack on the trail? Are there any foods that you will never eat again?

I liked gas station mini doughnuts and danishes and subway sandwiches whenever possible. I hate all bars now and only keep them in case of emergency.

What did it feel like when you got to the finish line of the AZT after completing all three races? 

I was too preoccupied worrying about my friend, Teddie, who was waiting for me at 2 a.m., because I was taking 2 hours longer with my blown up tire. Then, I was so thankful for all the people who greeted me at the finish line. The Triple Crown itself hasn’t fully sunk in. 

Do you have any advice for someone lining up for the Triple Crown next year? 

Be nice to yourself and don’t forget to have fun.


Kristen Tonsager

What inspired you to attempt the Triple Crown Challenge? 

I met Brett Stepanik and Craig Fowler in 2017 on the CT (their final leg of their Triple Crown effort that year) and was completely intrigued by the thought of it. I knew I wasn’t ready back then and had no interest in the Tour Divide or AZT, frankly! It wasn’t until 2021 that the thought began really creeping in (after another successful CTR and 1st place women’s finish on the AZTR300), and then in 2022 I laid out my intentions to Joe (my husband) and the universe set the rest in motion!

What intimidated you most about the challenge before you started?  

The hike through the Grand Canyon had always been the most intimidating part.

What is a high point you experienced during your races?

Tour Divide: It’s so hard to pick just one – the TD was full of so many incredible moments, but seeing the LOVE’s truck stop in Wamsutter, WY after the windiest day through the Great Basin certainly stands out.  I think the head wind must have been 60MPH at times, blowing me off the bike. I remember getting to the turn with 40-ish miles to Wamsutter, straight headwind, and being a bit heartbroken, but I got back on the bike and pedaled my heart towards town. I was never so happy to see a truck stop! The final two miles to the border was also the most elated I ever felt on the TD, because I finally let myself say “I DID IT.”

Colorado Trail: I started climbed up 10-Mile around 11pm and ran into a girl attempting the hiking FKT DEN->DGO. It was really cool to share each other’s excitement, pain and grit and it rejuvenated my spirit knowing someone else was still out there moving and fighting for their goal!  I spent a lot of time alone on CTR, so it was always nice to see other people!

Arizona Trail: Riding with Hannah into Gold Canyon was neat because it just felt like a fun night ride with a friend! Also, FINALLY seeing the trailhead at the North Rim – OY!

Tell us about a low point during your Triple Crown. Did you ever feel like you were going to have to quit?

When I mangled my brake lever just past General Springs on the AZTR, I felt like if I kept making these little mistakes I would throw it all away so close to the finish.  I sat, I cried, I made a video – and then I picked myself back up and became the mountain biker I knew I was.

What did your time between races look like? 

TD to CTR: I took about a week off of the bike, went back to working my full time job, ate everything in site and just tried to relax. I had a hard time mentally getting back on the singletrack. My first singletrack ride, I crashed and had to get nine stitches in my shin, so that kept me off the bike for another ten days. I think it was a blessing in disguise because when I did get back on the singletrack after that injury, I felt 100% ready to go! I picked up my training plan again (Kurt Refsnider’s plan) and continued to work long hours at my job and train at night and on the weekends.

CTR to AZTR: I was so ready to just get the AZTR started after CTR finished!  It felt like an eternity!  I took about two weeks off from the singletrack and was just commuting and riding around town.  Again, back to the long hours at work and picked up the training plan again at night and on the weekends. I turned 41 between these two races, so I enjoyed celebrating my birthday! Joe and I started working pretty heavily on my custom hiking harness for the Canyon, and would work all day and then prototype at his shop late into the night. I started hiking more and introducing hikes with the bike in the harness to make adjustments for the final iteration.

Did you have a favorite race in the Triple Crown? What was special about that particular race?

CTR will always hold a special place in my heart. It was the first trail that I toured and then raced. It always calls back to me.

Rank the races from easiest to most difficult. Why would you rank them that way? 

Tour Divide – the days are long, but the terrain is pretty straightforward and you can cover a lot of miles in a day. There are many resupply opportunities (except in NM) and the comraderie you build as you leap frog with different people helps the days go by. It’s definitely NOT easy, and there are many things you need to study and be prepared for, but looking back, it seems like the easiest one.

Colorado Trail – The elevation and the singletrack can be very challenging, but it’s a trail that was built so beautifully that the hard times can be overcome by the beauty that you experience. The resupply points can be tough if you have a slower pace, but the water is plentiful! The pace this year felt especially fast, so I felt the challenge to keep up!

Arizona Trail – No water, long stretches between resupply, challenging singeltrack, rocks, wash, rocks, wash, rocks, rocks, GRAND CANYON, wash, rocks. A beautiful, but extremely challenging series of trails, very challenging weather from extreme heat to extreme cold. It takes way longer than you think.

What was the most challenging part of completing the Triple Crown? (mental challenges? physical? dealing with real life?)

The mental fortitude to keep going. I never allowed myself to feel “done” after any race. No matter how much I wanted to just sit on the couch, I got back to the training plan because if I was going to fail, it would be because I wasn’t prepared. 

Do you have a favorite piece of gear that you used in all three races? 

My NoxGear 39g speaker!

What was your favorite snack on the trail? Are there any foods that you will never eat again?

Tour Divide: Grapes and Peanut M&Ms

CTR: Iced Coffee protein powder that I would drink out of a Ziploc bag – ha!

AZTR: Apples and Skittles

I think I need a break from BOMB burritos for awhile!

What did it feel like when you got to the finish line of the AZT after completing all three races? 

As I descended the final switchbacks towards Stateline CG, I got goosebumps all over and I said to myself “I DID IT!” I ran into Alexandera (she was filming) and we hugged and cried and then I cried into Joe’s arms when I got to the finish. Those two moments, I was completely overcome with joy that I completed this journey.

Do you have any advice for someone lining up for the Triple Crown next year?

Train for it. Be prepared. Be confident. Don’t overthink it. Stay focused.

Stay positive. Be kind to yourself. You don’t have to be the fastest, you just have to finish!

Is there anything else you’d like to share?

My full time job is the Head of Interior Design for a small boutique architecture firm in Denver, so it has nothing to do with bikes!

I’m not sponsored, but I do get all my bikepacking gear for free from JPaks, my husband’s business ;) and my company is super generous to let me have all of the time off! 

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